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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
for a powerful hit from hurricane sandy, as it barreled toward the east coast today. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we look at what state and local officials have done to prepare and examine why the storm is so large and dangerous. >> ifill: then, we turn to the presidential race, as the weather forces both candidates to cancel dozens of campaign stops. we get analysis from susan page and dan balz. >> woodruff: the political campaigns know more about you than you think. we have the first of two reports from hari sreenivasan on efforts to track voters online. >> this could be the year that digital strategies decide what is shaping up to be a razor-close election, but who is watching us and how much do they know about us? >> ifill: jeffrey brown talks with author bill ivey about his prescription for remaking america's democracy. >> well, i think what we need is to rediscover progressive values and put them forward. i'm arguing for not bigger government but i think different government. >> woodruff: and scott schaefer of public television's
. >> woodruff: the giant hybrid storm named sandy left a growing toll today. officials reported at least 39 people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water closed major commuter tunnels linking manhattan with otherboros contributing to the worst damage to the subway system in its 108 years. >> last night we could look down this street here and we saw the river coming toward us and it actually looked like something out of a movie. it was unbelievable. >> woodruff: equally unbelievable, winds of at least 80 miles an hour blew out the bright lights that usually dominate the manhattan skyline. some one million homes and businesses in and around the city lost power. today mayor michael bloomberg appealed for understanding amid warnings it could take days to restore all transit service and power. >> we
update the aftermath of sandy as president obama gets a first hand look at the devastation along new jersey's shoreline. >> ifill: then, how do you plan for increasingly common super storms? ray suarez examines that as part of our series: coping with climate change. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown reports on the battle of the ground game, hard fought on wisconsin's turf. >> who knew? it turns out that green bay is one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drug-sniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
of the da here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: hurricane sandy tracked toward the east coast of the u.s. today after leaving at least 40 people dead across the caribbean. it battered the bahamas as a category-one storm today, knocking down trees and power lines as it went. and sandy is already stirring up strong winds and pounding surf along the florida coastline. where exactly the storm lands in the u.s. next week is still a question, but preparations for heavy rains and high winds were underway from the mid-atlantic to new england. forecasters say the hurricane could spawn a "super storm", after colliding with a cold front fm the rth and a winter storm in the west. for more, we turn to jeannette calle of accuweather.com. >> so janth heading into this weekend, what do people on the eastern see board have to be concerned about? >> sandy will continue to head northward tonight into tomorrow. an area that should be on the lookout over the next 24 hours include northeast florida to coastal georgia, including eastern sections of the carolinas. we're talking squally weather beginning later
wall street today. instead, stocks sank on worries that the costs of hurricane sandy will eat into profits. the dow jones industrial average lost 139 points to close at 13,093. the nasdaq fell almost 38 points to close at 2,982. for the week, the dow and the nasdaq were off a fraction of 1%. korean auto makers hyundai and kia could end up paying hundreds of millions of dollars to car owners as compensation for overstating fuel economy. the environmental protection agency now says an audit revealed that 13 models averaged up to six miles a gallon less than advertised. some 900,000 vehicles sold in the last three years are affected. u.s. intelligence officials have rejected claims they failed to answer the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. there've been reports the cia told its security officers to "stand down" and not try to repel the attackers. senior intelligence officials denied that on thursday. they said a security team responded within 25 minutes, even though they were outmanned and outgunned. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >>
of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other waterside cities. the massive force of the storm's destruction along the jersey shore came fully into view today. town after town presented stark scenes of wrecked homes and boats, underscoring the long process of rebuilding that lies ahead. one of those towns was the long beach community north of atlantic city, where army national guard troops arrived to assist. >> a lot of devastation. the island has been hit very hard. from what i understand there is roughly 18,000 homes without power, there is severe gas leaks, so right now we are just trying to get everything together for the office of emergency management here and the different municipalities and just assist them with whatever needs they have going on. >> brown: and even three days later, some long beach residents still could not believe the power of the storm. >> this was the deepest water i have ever seen, in my lifetime of being here. i was 11 in the '62 storm and the water
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)